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VIRTUAL PRE-MEETING SESSIONS

Mentoring Session: Clinician Scientist

Friday, January 5, 2024
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM ET
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Balancing demanding research and clinical responsibilities is challenging, but also provides unique research avenues and experiences. In this session, two leading clinician-researchers will share their experiences and lead a discussion about how clinicians can successfully integrate scientific investigation into their work.
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Speakers:
-Jay Rubinstein, M.D., Ph.D.
Virginia Merrill Bloedel Professor, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
-Konstantina Stankovic, M.D., Ph.D.
Bertarelli Foundation Professor and Chair, Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery
Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA

Mentoring Session: Publishing

Friday, January 5, 2024
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM ET
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Sharing work in a peer-reviewed publication is an exciting and rewarding conclusion to a body of work, however the journey can be daunting when deciding when data collection is complete, choosing an appropriate journal, considering impact factor, sharing elucidating negative data, and deliberating other factors. On the other end of the manuscript, peer-reviewing submissions is a gratifying way to help the field while getting a sneak peek at bleeding-edge research, yet presents challenges when balancing praise and critiques while considering your own biases. In this session, two editors at top journals will share good approaches in publishing and reviewing research, and lead an open discussion where questions and discussion are encouraged.
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Speakers:
-Peter Barr-Gillespie, Ph.D.
Professor of Otolaryngology & Chief Research Officer
Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR
-Ronna Hertzano, M.D., Ph.D
Chief, Neurotology Branch, Division of Intramural Research at NIH, NIDCD, Bethesda, MD
Adjunct Clinical Professor, Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

Mentoring Session: mentor-mentee communication

Monday, January 8, 2024
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM ET
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Good scientific mentorship is key for the personal and professional growth of trainees in academia. An effective way to maintain a good mentor-mentee relationship is good communication between both parties. In this session, trainees will discuss effective communication techniques, strategies to manage their relationships with their mentors, and techniques to resolve communication challenges to maximize the benefit from mentoring relationships. This session will consist of a presentation from a panel of leading scientists in an interactive forum for questions and discussion.
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Speakers:
-Teresa Mastracci, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Biology
Indiana University- Indianapolis, IN
-Monita Chatterjee, Ph.D.
Senior Scientist and Director, Auditory Prostheses & Perception Laboratory, Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE

Mentoring Session: wORK-LIFE BALANCE

Monday, January 8, 2024
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM ET
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Research can be an overwhelming environment, with days long experiments and late night analysis sessions. The attrition of great researchers is very high, as people suffer from burnout because they didn’t take proper precautions. In this session, we talk about strategies on how to create and maintain a good work-life balance and foster a long and above all healthy career in research.
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Speakers:
-Angela Garinis, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor and Clinical Audiologist at Oregon Health & Science University
Principal Investigator at VA – National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland, OR
-Melissa Caras, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Biology
University of Maryland, College Park, MD

IN-PERSON AT THE MWM: SESSION HIGHLIGHTS

ARO Diversity & Minority Affairs Committee SPONSORED Workshop: Supportive allyship & stem

Sunday, February 4, 2024
4:00 PM - 6:00 PM PT
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The Association for Research in Otolaryngology (ARO) is committed to fostering scientists and technical experts that welcome diverse people, approaches, and ideas. While ARO is becoming more diverse, it reflects a profile largely of Causasian/white and male-identifying members that is characteristic of STEM fields. Thus, the ARO Diversity & Minority Affairs Committee (DMAC) is dedicated to increasing equity and inclusion within the ARO community with year-round educational programming for its members. Last year, the ARO DMAC hosted a well-attended MidWinter Meeting workshop that discussed microaggressions, allyship, and equitable mentoring focused on racial, ethnic and sexual identity minority groups. The culture of sexism, however, is still present in the STEM community. Workplace sexism is a source of stress for non-male-identifying individuals that leads to work dissatisfaction, burnout, and job departure. Allyship by male-identifying coworkers can be a powerful tool for mitigating the impact of sexism. Therefore, for the 2024 MidWinter Meeting, we propose to dive deeper into gender allyship. The main objectives of this workshop are to provide participants with a descriptive overview of allyship, help them identify situations when allyship is needed, and educate them on how to build allyship safely and supportively.

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Speakers:
Dr. Meg Warren is an Associate Professor of Management at Western Washington University. She is a researcher, keynote speaker, author, and psychologist with expertise in allyship, inclusiveness and cultural factors affecting wellbeing. Her award-winning research uses a positive psychology approach to study how individuals from relatively privileged groups can serve as allies to marginalized groups.

ARO Diversity & Minority Affairs Committee Sponsored Symposium: The Leaky Pipeline: How Can Mentors Better Support, Advocate, and Encourage Women and Underrepresented Minorities to Remain in the Sciences?

Monday, February 5, 2024
10:15 AM - 12:15 PM PT
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The "leaky pipeline" metaphor describes the phenomenon that leads to a progressive loss of women and underrepresented minorities in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) disciplines at each stage of the educational system. Women in academia face many barriers to workplace equality, and although they represent more than half of all doctoral recipients in biology-related fields, they only make up 27% of the STEM workforce. Correspondingly, people of color, with disabilities, LGBTQIA+, and from low socioeconomic backgrounds often encounter harassment, prejudice, stereotype, and bias in form of microaggressions, stereotype threat, and imposter syndrome, which might contribute to reduced career achievements. The COVID-19 pandemic has further intensified the leaky pipeline and the underrepresentation of women and minorities in STEM. Numerous studies have shown that this continuing disproportionately low representation of women and minorities impedes innovation and discovery by systematically excluding individuals with the ability to make significant contributions to the scientific enterprise. The goals of this symposium are to provide tools to promote diversity in STEM and create opportunities for women and underrepresented minorities. For this, we have invited three distinguished speakers to discuss the societal factors that contribute to the leaky pipeline phenomenon, explore strategies for fostering inclusivity and equitable opportunities within institutions, share insights on empowering marginalized communities through mentorship and support networks, and present recommendations for creating inclusive workplaces that retain diverse talent.

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Speakers:
Dr. Cendrine Robinson, Chief Diversity Officer at NIDCD/NIH;
Dr. Barbara Shinn-Cunningham, Director and Professor of the Neuroscience Institute at Carnegie Mellon University; Dr. Lisa Cunningham, Scientific Director of the Division of Intramural Research, and Lab Chief, Laboratory of Hearing Biology and Therapeutics at NIDCD/NIH; and Dr. Carolyn McClaskey, Assistant Res. Prof. USC, 2023 Hearing Health Foundation Awardee